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Lancaster University, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Degree Type & Length: 5 Years
UCAS Code: A100
University Code: L14
Is UKCAT needed? If so, how is it assessed? NO, BMAT
Academic entry requirement:

GCSE's At least grade B in the following required subjects: - Biology, Chemistry, and Physics (or Core & Additional Science) - English Language and - Mathematics 4 All other subjects must be at least grade C

Minimum grades required: AAA (b) Chemistry and Biology are subject requirements at A2 level. General Studies and Critical Thinking are only considered as the 4th subject. Only one of Maths or Further Maths will be considered. We will consider applications from applicants who have taken 3 years to achieve the required grades at A-level 6

E-mail: medicine@lancaster.ac.uk
Medical School Website: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fhm/
Medical School Contact Information: Faculty of Health and Medicine,
Furness College,
Lancaster University,
Lancaster, LA1 4YG,
United Kingdom
T: +44 (0)1524 594547
Course Structure:

In Year 1, you will be based primarily at the University. Through eleven 2-week PBL modules, you will be introduced to key concepts in biomedical and social science, and learn about normal structure and function of the human body. You will receive a thorough grounding in basic clinical skills (examinations, procedures and techniques) and undertake extensive communication skills training to prepare you for patient contact in Years 2-5.

Each PBL module spans a two week period and a typical timetable for each PBL module looks like this:

 

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Week 1

Lecture
PBL
Self-study

Lecture
CALC
Self-study

Lectures
Self-study

Lecture
Clinical Skills
Self-study

Lecture
CMP
Self-study

Week 2

Lecture
PBL
Self-study

Lecture
CALC
Self-study

Lectures
Self-study

Lecture
Clinical Skills
Self-study

Lecture
PBL
Self-study

PBL: Problem Based Learning

CALC: Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre

CMP: Communication for Medical Practice

SSM1

In Year 1, you will complete your first Special Study Module. Over the course of 4 weeks, you will explore a subject area beyond the normal core curriculum, developing key skills in information retrieval, critical appraisal of information sources and report-writing. You can choose the topic to study from a wide range of possible SSM titles. You will be assigned a convenor, an expert your chosen field, to guide and support you through your SSM.

Community Attachment

You will undertake your first clinical placement in the second term of Year 1. You will work in pairs to practice your newly acquired communication and clinical skills through interacting with children and their parents, under supervision of a Health Visitor

 

Learning to Diagnose and Manage Illness

In year 2, you will be on campus Monday and Friday, spend two days per week on hospital placement and spend one day per week on Community-related activities, including several days in GP placements, community clinical teaching (CCT) sessions and two community-related assessments.

There are fifteen PBL modules in year 2, in which you will begin to think about the body in disease. You will build on the knowledge acquired in year 1, learning about common disease states, their pathology and management (through drugs, surgery and lifestyle interventions). Each PBL module spans a two-week period and a typical timetable for each PBL module looks like this:

 

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Week 1

Lectures
PBL

Hospital

Hospital

Community

Lectures
Anatomy

Week 2

Lectures
PBL

Hospital

Hospital

Community

Lectures
PBL

During your hospital placements, you will be involved in various learning activities: taking patient histories; preparing case presentations; engaging in key clinical experiences. Your learning will be guided by the clinical logbook, which sets clear expectations that you must fulfil and also functions as a record of your achievement, allowing staff to monitor your progress.

SSM2

In year 2, you will complete your second Special Study Module. Building on the skills developed during SSM1, you will explore another subject area, sourcing and critically appraising relevant information, and presenting your results as a written report. You will have the option to choose clinical SSM topics in year 2 and work with a consultant in your chosen field, who provides guidance and support.

 

Learning to Diagnose and Manage Illness

Year 3 comprises five rotations, each of which includes patient contact, clinical teaching, PBL and other teaching activities such as tutorials and lectures:

·         Women and Children

·         Care of the Elderly

·         Managing long-term conditions (a GP placement)

·         Therapeutics and Sexual Health

·         Community Mental Health

In PBL, you will start to use real clinical cases, rather than exploring a written scenario. For some of your PBL modules, you will present information from your own patient histories and use this information as the stimulus for developing your learning objectives.

SSM3

In year 3, you will complete your third Special Study Module. The SSM3 project is more student-led than previous SSMs but you will still be guided and supported by a specialist convenor.

 

Learning to Diagnose and Manage Illness

In Year 4, you will spend a minimum of three days a week in hospital and one day a week in General Practice. You will complete two 16-week blocks, each of which will include patient contact, clinical teaching, PBL and other teaching activities, such as lectures or tutorials. In PBL, you will continue to use real clinical cases, rather than exploring a written scenario, in some instances.

Block 1:  Acute Adult Care

The block comprises four clinical placements as follows:

Acute Medicine

Medical Specialities

General Surgery

Surgical Specialities

Block 2: The Specialties

The block comprises four clinical placements as follows:

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Psychiatry

Paediatrics

Palliative care

Primary Care, longitudinal placement

You will spend one day per week, across both blocks, learning about primary care.  You will spend 16 days in a GP practice and 16 days will be dedicated to Community Clinical teaching, with an expert GP tutor. 

Final Exams

You will sit your final examinations at the end of Year 4, allowing you to focus on preparation for clinical practice in the apprenticeship-style Year 5.

Elective

After completing your final examinations, you will spend five weeks on elective placement. You will arrange the elective yourself, with advice and guidance from Lancaster Medical School. The elective is an opportunity to broaden your clinical experience and learn about healthcare delivery in another setting. You may choose to spend your elective abroad, observing differences in healthcare delivery in another country or you may choose to spend your elective exploring a specialty of particular interest to you.

Intercalated Degree

Between Years 4 and 5 of the MBChB programme, you will have the option to take a year out from your studies to complete an intercalated degree. Intercalation provides you with an opportunity to study a subject related to medicine at greater depth or engage in academic research for a year.

If you decide to complete an intercalated degree, you will suspend studies on the MBChB programme for a period of twelve months whilst you undertake studies for a BSc, an MSc, an MRes or an MPhil degree. You will then return to the MBChB programme at the beginning of Year 5. 

 

Apprenticeship-style, intensive clinical experience

In Year 5, you will undertake five clinical attachments, two of which are Selectives in Advanced Medical Practice (SAMPs):

·         Acute Care

·         Community Placement

·         SAMP1

·         SAMP2

·         Shadowing an FY1 doctor

 

You can choose to follow SAMPs in a wide variety of different clinical specialties, providing the opportunity to explore different potential medical careers during the course of your undergraduate degree.

Each attachment consists of 7 weeks of intensive clinical experience. A portfolio is used to guide and assess your learning. You will take responsibility for your own learning and engage in reflective practice, to prepare you Foundation training and life-long learning.

 

Lancaster University, Faculty of Health and Medicine